Scientists working to understand how monkeys rebound in wake of yellow fever epidemic

My University of Wisconsin–Madison colleague, Karen Strier, has studied the muriqui monkeys of Brazil for her entire career. Now, the in small patch of forest where she works, howler monkeys have become victims of the yellow fever epidemic spreading across the country.

The university has done an informative story on how the epidemic is affecting both the prospects for conservation of these wild primates and the scientific study of their behavior: “Yellow fever killing thousands of monkeys in Brazil”.

When she first arrived at her study forest, known as RPPN Feliciano Miguel Abdala, there were just 50 muriquis. By September 2016, there were nearly 340, representing one-third of the species’ total known population. The animals reside in just 10 forests in southeastern Brazil and nowhere else in the world. Strier’s efforts and those of her colleagues have helped restore their numbers.
She is relieved that, so far, the muriquis appear to be less susceptible to yellow fever. “It was really tense – scary – to go into the forest, knowing the howlers were gone but not knowing how bad things might also be for the muriquis,” Strier recalls.