All posts tagged with social

Epstein’s science posse

1 minute read

I have been following the story of the late Jeffrey Epstein very closely. The combination of politics and money for this billionaire alleged child sex traffi...

Link: ‘Africa’ in the desert? Stop it now

less than 1 minute read

This is going around from people who think it’s hipster and cool and ought to know better: “Africa by Toto to play ‘for all eternity’ in Namib desert - video...

Link: The phylogeny of our plant foods

less than 1 minute read

The Botanist in the Kitchen takes a look at the phylogenetic relationships among some of the major plant foods in Western diets: “The Food Plant Tree of Life...

Link: Nuts and civilizations

less than 1 minute read

California Sunday Magazine has a feature profiling farmers losing their water to nut growers in California’s San Joaquin Valley: “Dry”. It’s a story of wells...

Perils of recycling

less than 1 minute read

Today’s public service announcement, by Virginia Postrel: “Recycling Eyeglasses Is a Feel-Good Waste of Money”.

No echoing the echo chamber here

4 minute read

Seems to be a theme going in the press today: The Internet is making us stupid by connecting us with the things we like.

Social media in education

1 minute read

Krystal D’Costa (Anthropology in Practice) links to a mini-documentary about the role of social media in the education of “Gen-Y”: “Decade 2: Encouraging Edu...

Questioning the "evolution of an underclass"

2 minute read

A little life history theory can be a dangerous thing. Case in point: “Die young, live fast: The evolution of an underclass.” The article discusses correlati...

Mmmm…geese….

less than 1 minute read

New York is considering a plan “to eliminate 170,000 wild Canada geese”:

Bones for sale

less than 1 minute read

The Washington Post has a story about resellers of human bone and the people who buy them: “An artistic body of work’s bone of contention.”

Neanderate yourself

less than 1 minute read

If you want to give yourself a caveman (or cavewoman) makeover, well, now there’s an app for that:

Tim Time

less than 1 minute read

Time magazine has named paleoanthropologist Tim White as one of its 2010 top 100 influential people. Sean B. Carroll provides a short profile of White’s rece...

Twitter thinking

less than 1 minute read

Not a comment on anyone in particular, but I’m beginning to wonder if some Twitter users are actually robots. I mean, how exactly does one follow thousands o...

iPad tryout

1 minute read

Tried out an iPad this afternoon. It’s a slick little device, very nice looking for games. Some people have commented on iPhone apps looking ugly on the larg...

Lateness

less than 1 minute read

Jeffrey Zeldman: advice for business that works just as well in academics: “Show up early”

Vampire odontology

less than 1 minute read

Lawn Chair Anthropology: “Halloween special: Heterotopy, pleiotropy, and the origins of vampires”

Is modern man a "wimp"?

4 minute read

That’s the conclusion of a Reuters article, which describes a book by Australian science writer Peter McAllister. The book is titled, Manthropology: The Scie...

Schoolective statistics

1 minute read

Bill Gates is spending a lot of money to make schools better. And for some reason it’s not working. Gates says it’s bad teachers:

Who's your favorite hominin now?

1 minute read

A couple of weeks ago I gave some Google Trends statistics on search terms for fossil hominins. The winner then was “erectus”, with “Neanderthal” coming in a...

Burning money

1 minute read

At Savage Minds, every so often they’ve included a post about the perennial desert-subversive-anarcho-utopian event “Burning Man”. Recently, Adam Fish wrote ...

Wolfram paleoanthropology

less than 1 minute read

On the topic of web searching, I just thought I’d point out that when you search for “Homo erectus” on Wolfram Alpha, what you get is stats for the stupid Na...

Who's your favorite hominin?

2 minute read

Yes, I know, hominin is driving me crazy, too. It’s a taxonomic diktat of breathtaking doofery, but I think we’re stuck with it. So I’ve been writing it to ...

Book notes: Free, by Chris Anderson

9 minute read

I read Chris Anderson’s book because it was, well, “Free”. The book’s thesis is simple: Sometimes people profit by giving things away.

Take me off this list

less than 1 minute read

Today my inbox is full of clueless n00bs writing, “Please remove me from this list” notes in response to some random bulk e-mail.

The cadaver overload

1 minute read

I hesitate to pass along this story, but I think it’s probably of general interest to anthropologists: “Overload of bodies fills Tennessee morgues”:

Working your schedule around your work

1 minute read

I saw this essay on Slashdot, and I think it’s worth spreading around: Paul Graham (of venture capital firm Y Combinator) writes “Maker’s schedule, manager’s...

A history of science journalism

2 minute read

In the current Nature, the special section on science journalism (due to the upcoming World Conference of Science Journalists) includes an essay history of s...

Names, culture, and popularity

2 minute read

I’ve had this paper about “adoption speed” and cultural tastes on my desktop for more than a month, meaning to write something about it. Here’s the abstract:

Craft beers of the ancients

less than 1 minute read

Scientific American reports on how Dogfish Head Craft Brewery is hooking up with anthropologists to replicate prehistoric brews:

Biohacking

less than 1 minute read

Word of the day: biohacking.

Kindling my interest

2 minute read

I follow technology here once in a while, but I actually follow it pretty closely personally. As a research tool, the new Kindle DX is getting close to somet...

Does your Style have the right Elements?

1 minute read

I didn’t notice myself, but a number of writers have been pointing out the fiftieth anniversary of a familiar classic, Strunk and White’s The Elements of Sty...

"Historians Gone Wild" on Oprahbulations

2 minute read

I think that this NY Times story by Noam Cohen, titled “In Douglass Tribute, Slave Folklore and Fact Collide,” is just fascinating. It’s an old story (from e...

Knapping a handaxe

less than 1 minute read

Science magazine’s “Origins” blog is running a little feature by archaeology student Steven Goldstein on how to knap a handaxe.

A debate: information overload?

1 minute read

If you’re looking for a way to waste your time today, you might check out The Economist’s online debate, which focuses on the question of whether the world i...

Cloaking

less than 1 minute read

“Cloaking” is like the physics version of the hobbits – catchy name from a fantasy story and fascinating to the press. But there came a time reading “invisib...

Science from television drama

1 minute read

Wired has a story about the trend toward more television dramas with science content. Some may disagree that a show like CSI is especially science-related; n...

Rubik algorithm to Ph.D.

less than 1 minute read

Bina Venkataraman tells the interesting story of Jessica Fridrich, who as a Czech teenager in 1981 developed the fastest algorithm for solving the Rubik’s cu...

The tuition Singularity

5 minute read

The Singularity is a future time when, in theory, the pace of technological change becomes so great that we cannot predict the course of future developments ...

Restoration

less than 1 minute read

I found myself touched by this story about the restoration of Raphael’s “Madonna of the Goldfinch.” And glad that some people make it their life’s work to pr...

A "Spore" review in Science

6 minute read

John Bohannon (“The Gonzo Scientist”) gives the videogame “Spore” a flunking grade. He sits down four scientists, including Niles Eldredge, to play the game....

Prince Valiant encounters Neandertals?

less than 1 minute read

I don’t have a picture, but this week Prince Valiant seems to have encountered a band of Neandertals. At least, they look just like Neandertals that Charles ...

Word of the day: pareidolia

less than 1 minute read

Your brain works to see faces in cars, and automakers want to exploit your taste for the mean machine:

Terry Pratchett describes his Alzheimer's

less than 1 minute read

I know many readers are fans of Terry Pratchett, as I am. He has a long, heartfelt article about his experiences with PCA, a type of early-onset Alzheimer’s....

Gaming evolution

1 minute read

Carl Zimmer has a NY Times article today on “Spore”, a video game that let’s you “evolve” life forms from single-celled organisms up to modern-day complexity...

A new "Wizard"?

less than 1 minute read

Am I the only one who noticed the irony of a car company named “Tesla” opening its premier dealership in a city called “Menlo Park”?