All posts tagged with science communication

More on posters

1 minute read

Nell Greenfieldboyce of NPR covers the trend toward making posters at academic conferences more like billboards on the highway: “To Save The Science Poster, ...

Conspiracy theories in pseudoarchaeology

1 minute read

Science magazine has a recent online article by journalist Lizzie Wade looking at the growing influence of ancient aliens and other pseudoarchaeological nons...

Link: Scientists and ‘science denial’

less than 1 minute read

A short essay by Kari Fischer from the New York Academy of Sciences, in The Scientist: “Opinion: What You Believe about “Science Denial” May Be All Wrong”.

Is Facebook killing science news?

3 minute read

I’ve observed that the coverage of genetics and evolution in mainstream media has become worse over the last several years. It seems that social media, espec...

MOOCs after five years

3 minute read

Five years ago, I was just starting to prepare a massive open online course (MOOC). That course development would be an 18-month adventure for me.

Link: Blogging and careers

1 minute read

This is a nice piece in ChronicleVitae by Terry McGlynn: “Why Blogging Is Still Good for Your Career”.

Science blogs changing with the times?

less than 1 minute read

A short piece “On the evolution of the science blogosphere” by the Andy Extance of the ScienceSeeker team has some interesting notes on current statistics in...

Science Cafe, Tuesday February 4

less than 1 minute read

I’ll be participating in a fun science outreach event this Tuesday, the Science Cafe at the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery:

Wellcome Trust funds public engagement

1 minute read

The Wellcome Trust, a major funder of biomedical research in the UK, has made a new 4.5 million pound investment in public engagement, as explained by Clare ...

Changing science education

1 minute read

As the new semester is getting underway, the New York Times asked a bunch of scientists and students what they would advocate to improve science education. T...

Speak up and matter

2 minute read

Current Biology is running a short editorial by Geoffrey North, wishy-washing its way through a non-opinion about the value of blogging in science (“Social M...

Profile of Deborah Blum

1 minute read

The Guardian interviews my University of Wisconsin-Madison colleague and friend, Deborah Blum, on what inspires her to write about science: “Deborah Blum on ...

Blog of the seven veils

1 minute read

Why should academics consider blogging, and when should they band together to work on a group blog? An interview from early 2012 helps to answer those questi...

Recantation of a former genetic know-nothing

1 minute read

The text of this lecture by Mark Lynas is remarkable (“Lecture to Oxford Farming Conference, 3 January 2013”). Lynas gained prominence as a critic of genetic...

Pseudoscience and TED

2 minute read

Phil Plait discusses (“TEDx Talks: Some Ideas Are Not Worth Spreading”) a public letter from the TED organizers to their derivative TEDx community: “A letter...

Cutting room floors

2 minute read

Reading items on my desktop, I found a rant I had written a while back. I generally don’t post rants, but a decent amount of time has passed…

Academic stultification

1 minute read

My University of Wisconsin colleague, the historian Bill Cronon has a recent essay that asks why, if history is so interesting to the public, “professional” ...

Shoelaces tied together

less than 1 minute read

Zen Faulkes comments on last week’s National Academies meeting on Science Communication: “Self-defeating prophecy”.

Download the universe

1 minute read

Carl Zimmer and a broad group of science writers and scientists have started a new collaborative review site, focused specifically on science e-books and app...

How to blog for your lab

1 minute read

Christie Wilcox makes a case that every lab should be doing science outreach on social media: “Social media for scientists Part 1: It’s our job, and Part 2: ...

No echoing the echo chamber here

4 minute read

Seems to be a theme going in the press today: The Internet is making us stupid by connecting us with the things we like.

My turn as a science fair judge in Italy

3 minute read

Yesterday I had the distinctive experience as a judge of a scientific poster session, featuring the work of Italian high school students. The session was in ...

Public impact

less than 1 minute read

Alice Bell on public engagement for social scientists and humanists: “Being professional about ‘impact’.”

Frinking around Titan

less than 1 minute read

From an article about exploring Saturn’s moon, Titan, I have never in my life seen a scientist quote that sounds more like something Professor Frink would sa...

McPhee on writing about science

2 minute read

The Paris Review has a long interview with writer John McPhee (“The Art of Nonfiction No. 3, John McPhee”). I like the writer interviews they have, and it is...

Conference blogging by Sci

less than 1 minute read

Scicurious has written a very nice howto giving concrete advice about blogging a conference: “How To Blog a Conference”. Lots and lots of good ideas and advi...

Engaging with the public

2 minute read

Alice Bell raises an essential question: “Whats this public engagement with science thing then?”

The "gay caveman"

3 minute read

I am just about to go crazy today. I just can’t seem to escape the “gay caveman” story.

Blogging archaeology

less than 1 minute read

Following up on Nicolas Laracuente’s Storify collections of tweets from the SAA meetings, I wanted to point to his compilation from the Blogging Archaeology ...

Science Pub, day of creationism

3 minute read

I had a wonderful afternoon Sunday at the Madison Science Pub. The featured guest was Ron Numbers, the historian of science at UW-Madison whose research has ...

Madison Science Pub profiled

less than 1 minute read

Ron Seely of the Wisconsin State Journal has a nice story in today’s (Sunday) edition about the Madison Science Pub (“Science Pub organizer taps scientists f...

"Gutless" TV science

4 minute read

Martin Robbins last week posted a column with a great title: “Return to the Silence: Is theatre exposing the gutlessness of TV science?” In it, he discusses ...

Public engagement

1 minute read

Nature’s Gene Russo has a nice article this week about scientists’ attitudes toward colleagues who do lots of public outreach: “Outreach: Meet the press”.

Battlestar mitochondria

1 minute read

Wired has an interview with the authors of a book titled, The Science of Battlestar Galactica. I wasn’t a viewer of the show, so I wasn’t aware that the mito...

Backdrop to scientist quotes

less than 1 minute read

JR Minkel did a story on evolved sex differences for Scientific American (“Student Surveys Contradict Claims of Evolved Sex Differences”). Personally, I neve...

Poster Venn

less than 1 minute read

I love the Poster Venn diagram” from Better Posters – stuff people usually put on academic posters intersected with what viewers care about. So I won’t cut a...

STEM plunk

less than 1 minute read

Natalie Angier, who knows something about how to introduce science to the masses, blows off some steam about STEM in this week’s Science Times:

Dawkins and Hewitt

5 minute read

I want to point to an interview between conservative radio host Hugh Hewitt and Richard Dawkins, on the subject of Dawkins’ new book, The Greatest Show on Ea...

Science sensationalism

less than 1 minute read

Backreaction: “Science, Writers, and the Public - A bizarre love triangle”:

Science illiteracy in the media

1 minute read

On the general topic of the declining status of science in the media, I thought I would just mention on a tangent…

Leaving it to the societies

2 minute read

Carl Zimmer, giving a quick synopsis of three recent books on science communication, begins his post:

Science and public Pew/AAAS survey

less than 1 minute read

A Pew Institute-AAAS survey is in the news; Pew’s summary of the survey conclusions is online, very readable, and doesn’t seem to make the obvious misreprese...

A history of science journalism

2 minute read

In the current Nature, the special section on science journalism (due to the upcoming World Conference of Science Journalists) includes an essay history of s...

Why Files

less than 1 minute read

Alan Boyle’s “Cosmic Log” is featuring UW science journalists Terry Devitt and David Tenenbaum, whose website “The Why Files” has been reporting science onli...

Science journalism, blogging, and the web

6 minute read

Nature (open access) discusses the decline of science journalism and the rise of blogs. The article profiles John Timmer, whose stuff at Nobel Intent I read ...

Diagnosing science reporting

3 minute read

The Guardian is running a great editorial about why (and how) science reporting is bad: OK, here's something weird. Every week in Bad Science we either v...