All posts tagged with Miocene

Photo: Daemonelix

less than 1 minute read

This is a Daemonelix, burrow of the ancient beaver relative Palaeocastor. There is a nice exposure of Miocene deposits at Agate Fossil Beds National Monument...

Anthropology 105, lecture 5: Hemoglobin

less than 1 minute read

In this lecture, I do a bit of a departure by discussing a body part that is microscopic: the hemoglobin molecule that carries oxygen inside of our red blood...

The diet of Gigantopithecus

5 minute read

Gigantopithecus has often been described as a bamboo eater, based on analogy with another kind of large herbivore in China, the giant panda. Giant pandas hav...

Meet Gigantopithecus

1 minute read

Gigantopithecus blacki was, as its name implies, a gigantic ape from the Pleistocene of China. Its remains consist only of teeth and jaws, but these are of a...

Ugandapithecus skull found

less than 1 minute read

A brief report earlier this month from Agence France-Presse describes a new discovery of Ugandapithecus, worked on by Brigitte Senut and Martin Pickford: “20...

The homoplastic apes

3 minute read

Bernard Wood and Terry Harrison have published a review paper in NatureWood:Harrison:2011, arguing that the extent of anatomical convergence among Miocene ap...

Yellowstone

less than 1 minute read

I was talking about the Yellowstone series of eruptions with students the other day. Along those lines, this news item from Michael Reilly is interesting:

Miocene ape review, in brief

2 minute read

Science has a short essay by Terry Harrison this week about Miocene ape evolution: “Apes among the tangled branches of human origins.”

The floodgates of 5.33 Ma

1 minute read

I’ve had a paper sitting on my desktop for a couple of weeks: “Catastrophic flood of the Mediterranean after the Messinian salinity crisis”, by Garcia-Castel...

Glut suit riot

less than 1 minute read

On topic: A Primate of Modern Aspect reviews the anatomy of the Ardipithecus proximal femur.

Chimps R'n't Us

less than 1 minute read

Michael Balter reports on the “First 4 Million Years of Human Evolution” meeting: “Primatologists Go Ape Over Ardi”.

Ardi woes

less than 1 minute read

Fifteen years they had this thing, and they didn’t look at Oreopithecus?

Beneath the dawn chumans

less than 1 minute read

Thomas Mailund covers some recent modeling of the human-chimpanzee divergence: “Doubts about complex speciation between humans and chimpanzees”. Here’s the b...

Late Miocene fossil apes from Africa

9 minute read

Time for some attention to the Miocene apes. I’ve neglected them for the last few years, and there have been some interesting finds. I don’t mean the stuff t...

Sahelanthropus: "The femur of Toumaï?"

8 minute read

Some weeks ago, I wrote about an article by Alain Beauvilain and Jean-Pierre Watté, in my post, “Sahelanthropus: Did camelherders bury Toumaï facing Mecca?” ...

Hesperopithecus

less than 1 minute read

Worth reading: Laelaps on “Hesperopithecus”, “The ‘Million-Dollar Pig’s Tooth Mystery’”.

The Orrorin identity

3 minute read

There's nothing especially surprising about the functional interpretations in Richmond and Jungers' paper about the Orrorin BAR 1002'00 femur. They conclude...

New Year's predictions, 2008 edition

5 minute read

It's that time of year again -- the time when those boring ``Year in Review'' magazines are on newsstands, and when pundits make fools of themselves predict...

More on Chororapithecus

1 minute read

Ann Gibbons reports on the 10-million-year-old gorilla-like Chororapithecus, elaborating on the biogeographic interpretation I mentioned yesterday:

Frogs rafted, too

5 minute read

One of the strange things about primate evolution is the arrival of anthropoid monkeys in South America sometime during the Oligocene. South America was an ...

When duplicate genes diverge

5 minute read

One of the most important mechanisms of genetic evolution is gene duplication. There are a few well-known gene families, such as the globin gene family, who...

New Year's predictions, 2007 edition

4 minute read

It's a hazardous business, making predictions -- all the moreso because New Year's predictions have a deadline. If they don't happen this year, well, that's...

A challenge to Sahelanthropus

3 minute read

And it comes from me! My paper with Milford Wolpoff, Brigitte Senut, Martin Pickford, and Jim Ahern is now available online from PaleoAnthropology! The PDF ...

"Spacecraft all over the Pliocene"

9 minute read

Rex Dalton has a great two-page article in Nature about the bush vs. ladder dispute. It keys off of the Middle Awash Australopithecus anamensis article by Wh...

A ladder, not a bush?

5 minute read

Tim White and colleagues (2006) report on new fossils from Aramis and a new site, Asa Issie, with estimated dates between 4.1 and 4.2 million years ago.

Sahara at least 7 million years old

4 minute read

A concise 4-paragraph article by Mathieu Schuster and colleagues reports on dune deposits that show the Sahara formed during the Late Miocene.

Orrorin opera

2 minute read

There's a new paper by Tim White in the "In Press" portion of Comptes Rendus Palevol, titled "Early hominid femora: The inside story". It has a short introd...

When chimpanzees stand

5 minute read

The current (February 2006) issue of AJPA carries an article by Craig Stanford describing the context of bipedal posture for chimpanzees in the Bwindi Impen...

A convergent fossil panda's thumb

1 minute read

Stephen Jay Gould famously made the false thumb of the giant panda one of his hallmark examples of the structural vagaries of adaptation. His original essay...

Carel van Schaik interview in Times

1 minute read

Nice interview touching on Carel van Schaik's new book, Among Orangutans : Red Apes and the Rise of Human Culture. Much on van Schaik's observations of oran...

Proconsul book reviewed in Science

1 minute read

A couple of weeks ago, Robert Proctor reviewed Alan Walker and Pat Shipman's new book, The Ape in the Tree: An Intellectual and Natural History of Proconsul...

Heterochrony and island dwarfism

2 minute read

I'm reading through the volume Integrative Paths to the Past (Corruccini and Ciochon, eds.) because of a piece of work I've been doing, and I came across th...

The knuckle-walking anteater

4 minute read

Caley Orr (Personal page, Arizona State University) has an advance paper in AJPA examining convergent features in the wrists of knuckle-walking hominoids an...

On silk purses and pig's ears

2 minute read

This new paper by Jay Kelley (University of Illinois, Chicago) is about as close to a detective story that paleontologists get (via Palanthsci message board...

Money, status, and social cognition

10 minute read

Via Instapundit, a link to a review of the new book Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything. Looks like a very interesting bo...

NSF and data access

17 minute read

Mark Weiss from NSF appeared at the AAPA business meeting to discuss recent changes in the funding guidelines from the Physical Anthropology program. The mo...

Proximal radius variation in hominoids

3 minute read

Patel (2005) examines the morphology of the proximal radius in different species of apes. He sets the work into the context of earlier work on hominid posit...

PhyloCode and human evolution

23 minute read

The April issue of Discover has a feature article on PhyloCode, focusing on the roles of Jacques Gauthier and Kevin de Queiroz in trying to revise the code ...

Dental growth in early Homo

3 minute read

Dean and colleagues (2001) present a study of perikymata counts of anterior teeth (incisors and canines) in early humans and australopithecines, compared to...

Enamel thickness in Afropithecus

4 minute read

Tanya M. Smith and colleagues (2003) measured the enamel of two Afropithecus molars, examining both their thickness and the periodicity of enamel formation....

The life and times of Gigantopithecus

4 minute read

Russ Ciochon has a very nice article about Gigantopithecus up on his department webpage. The article appeared in Natural History magazine in 1991. It featu...

Chemistry and early hominid diets

17 minute read

The chemical analysis of bones to interpret diet rests on the observation that different foods vary in the composition of different chemical elements or iso...

Earliest hominids :: thoughts and roundup

6 minute read

Today I lectured on the earliest hominid samples for my graduate course on australopithecines. This is the first time I have been able to give a full lectur...

Speciation

16 minute read

Speciation is the cessation of interbreeding between one animal population and all other populations with which it formerly exchanged genes. When interbreed...

Proconsul :: overview

1 minute read

Perhaps the largest sample of Miocene ape fossils, dated over the longest time period, is Proconsul. Extending from over 22 million years ago to around 10 m...

Oreopithecus :: overview

1 minute read

Oreopithecus bambolii is known from a series of well-preserved fossils, including some relatively complete skeletons, from the north of Italy dated to betwee...

Lufengpithecus :: overview

less than 1 minute read

Lufengpithecus lufengensis is a fossil ape from China, dating to the latest Miocene and Pliocene. A single mandible from the site of Longgupo argues that Luf...

Gigantopithecus :: overview

1 minute read

Gigantopithecus blacki was, as its name implies, a gigantic ape from the Pleistocene of China. Its remains consist only of teeth and jaws, but these are of a...

The Great Rift Valley

3 minute read

The climate of the Early Pliocene differed from that of the Miocene primarily by the appearance of a cooling and drying trend across Africa, where early hom...

Sivapithecus

1 minute read

Sivapithecus includes a great diversity of Miocene ape species from South Asia. Fossils are known from between 10 and 7 million years ago, with many fossils ...

Ouranopithecus

less than 1 minute read

Ouranopithecus macedoniensis (called by some Graecopithecus) is from the Late Miocene of Greece, around 8 million years old. Based on its facial and dental a...

Fossil apes

4 minute read

The hominoids--the group including humans and living and fossil apes--originated sometime during the Oligocene period, between 34 and 24 million years ago. ...

Dryopithecus::overview

2 minute read

Today, the only non-human primate native to Europe is the Barbary macaque, which has extended its North African range to a small area including Gibraltar, o...

Sahelanthropus: a brief introduction

3 minute read

Note: I wrote this post in 2005. Later posts detail my own research on Sahelanthropus. My research with collaborators ultimately took a critical perspective ...

Australopithecus anamensis: overview

2 minute read

Note: I wrote this post in 2004. Much additional evidence about Au. anamensis has come to light since that time. Later posts present more up-to-date informat...