All posts tagged with journals

When peer review turns to trolling

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In University Affairs, environmental scientist Ryan Bullock looks at his career-worth of experience subjecting his research to peer review: “The trolls have ...

Self-citation quantified

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I always feel a little bit bad when I have to cite my own prior work for a new research paper. As scientists develop career trajectories, self-citation becom...

Supplementary data loss

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My inbox this morning has an article by Diana Kwon in The Scientist, looking into the data decay from the supplementary materials of published scientific art...

Should authors pay to submit their papers?

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An article by Tim Vines in The Scholarly Kitchen looks at the pay-to-submit model of open access publication: “Plan T: Scrap APCs and Fund Open Access with S...

Time to publish peer referee comments?

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A meeting at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute last week asked whether journals should start publishing the reviews they receive on papers. As reported by ...

Link: Sci-Hub profiled

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Verge has a long article on Sci-Hub, focusing on its founder, Alexandra Elbakyan: “Science’s Pirate Queen”.

Link: Referee troubles

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Leonid Schneider posts a fairly typically depressing story from a peer referee from Frontiers in Neuroscience. The story is basically an editor pressuring th...

Link: Sustaining open access databases

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Cameron Neylon considers some of the challenges in keeping open data access initiatives sustainable over the long term: “Squaring Circles: The economics and ...

Link: Costs of scientific publishing

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Jonathan Tennant and colleagues have a new review of the impacts of open access scientific publishing: “The academic, economic and societal impacts of Open A...

Link: The origin of peer review

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Nature has an essay by Alex Csiszar recounting the first episode of peer review by the Royal Society, negotiated between William Whewell and John Lubbock on ...

Peer review under the microscope

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The Frontiers Blog has provided a timely review of some of the new models of peer review that are being tried in different branches of scientific publishing:...

Should journals do post-pub review?

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Nikolai Slavov recently published an opinion piece in eLife arguing the advantages of post-publication review of scientific papers: “Point of view: Making th...

Link: Open access and APC double-dipping

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From Leti Kleyn, in the South African edition of The Conversation, a call for better institutional open access archives: “Why it’s getting harder to access f...

On the importance of saying you’re wrong

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Lior Pachter writes this week on his blog about the reactions and commentary around a post-publication peer review exercise he conducted on a 11-year-old pap...

High recent admixture reported for Oase 1

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Some readers have asked me what I think of the reporting from the recent Biology of Genomes conference, that Qiaomei Fu and colleagues from Svante Pääbo’s gr...

Open peer review: a note from a physicist

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I’d like to take note of this post by Sabine Hossenfelder, “Open peer review and its discontents”. She reflects on a growing cultural divide in science betwe...

A return for reviewers on open access

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This interview came out in October of last year, but a reader only recently brought it to my attention: “A Pay-it-Forward Approach to Open Access Publishing:...

Thinking of preprints in biology

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At the end of 2014, the arXiv preprint server published its one millionth article. Richard Van Noorden reports on the milestone for Nature News: “The arXiv p...

Link: The plagiarism problem in science

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Michael Lesk (2014) has a commentary on a new paper (Citron and Ginsparg 2014) that uncovers widespread plagiarism among published scientific papers. Lesk di...

Changing the currency of academic science

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John Ioannidis is well known as a critic of the way science has usually been practiced. I’ve linked to his work before (“Link: John Ioannidis and the scienti...

Time to trash anonymous peer review?

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This week’s Science magazine is organized on the theme of science communication. In addition to the John Bohannon “sting” operation I discussed in the last p...

Fear and the impact factor

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Mark Johnston, editor-in-chief of the journal, Genetics, recently published an editorial decrying scientists’ reliance on “impact factor” of journals to make...

Immediate publishing

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Michael Eisen: “The Glacial Pace of Change in Scientific Publishing”.

The costs of publication delays

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Joe Pickrell has written a valuable post on Genomes Unzipped about the future of publication in genetics: “The first steps towards a modern system of scienti...

PeerJ set to launch

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PeerJ founder Peter Binfield answers questions for Publishers’ Weekly: “Scholarly Publishing 2012: Meet PeerJ “.

This is totally serial

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Michael B. Eisen: “The solution to the serials crisis on campus”

Turning around the profits

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The absurdity of academic publishing is starting to get attention from the mainstream press. From The Economist: “Open sesame”.

Failure to replicate

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What if you set out to replicate a series of 53 “landmark” clinical trials in cancer treatment and found you could confirm only 6 of them? If you’re C. Glenn...

Wiki into journal

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PLoS Computational Biology has started a new collaboration with Wikipedia, in which short review articles called “topic pages” will be peer-reviewed, given j...

Open science interview

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NPR’s Science Friday interviewed open science advocate Michael Nielsen last week: “Can science be done without secrecy?” I like the headline.

Tenured inertia on publishing

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Danah Boyd rants “Save Scholarly Ideas, Not the Publishing Industry”. This is a well-worn topic here on my blog, but she hits on a useful theme: People with ...

Looking for pseudo-books

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Jason Baird Jackson posts some insights on how traditional journals can turn to open access tools (if not become open access), and how a startup online journ...

Can Watson navigate the medical literature?

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Last week, Computerworld reported that IBM’s famous “Watson” supercomputer is moving to its next challenge: prescribing cancer treatments for the WellPoint h...

Open access barriers

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Richard Poynder discusses how Open Access policies may be perversely costing universities even more money, in the lead-in to an interview about the Wellcome ...

Make journals work better

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George Monbiot writes in the Guardian with some sobering statistics about academic publishing: “Academic publishers make Murdoch look like a socialist”

An academic journal copyright story

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In a post from earlier this summer, info/library scientist Jeffrey Pomerantz describes his attempts to secure a less restrictive copyright agreement for a sc...

Open science link

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David Dobbs writes about the structural barriers to more open science: “Free Science, One Paper at a Time”. Summing up a large collaboration on Alzheimer’s r...

Retractions and grants

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Pascale Lane reviews a paper about retraction rates in top journals: “Papers ‘Not Meant to Be Factual’”.

Kin selection strikes back

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Last year I noted the publication of a paper in Nature by Martin Nowak, Corina Tarnita and Edward O. Wilson, which claimed that kin selection is not a suffic...

Open access megajournals

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The Occasional Pamphlet reflects on the new megajournal trend in open access: “A ray of sunshine in the open-access future”. PLoS ONE is being joined by SAGE...

PLoS Blogs

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PLoS now has blogs. The announcement accentuates that they have an equal representation of scientists and science journalists.

Guardian science blogs

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The Guardian now has a small network of science blogs. Their launch announcement includes this surprising factoid:

The price of erudition

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Did you know that the three-volume Handbook of Paleoanthropology is a thousand dollars from Amazon?

AnthroSource sleeps furiously

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Savage Minds’ crew has been discussing the future of publishing in the American Anthropological Association recently. Rex Golub compares Open Folklore to Ant...

Down with supplements

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The editor of the Journal of Neuroscience, John Maunsell, has announced that the journal will no longer permit authors to add “supplementary” material to the...

Fluffing the science

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Bora Zivkovic on a heavily-trod topic (“Why is some coverage of scientific news in the media very poor?”) describes some of his work sifting through press co...

Malapa embargo story

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Ivan Oransky writes “Embargo Watch”, which reports on issues related to journal embargoes and science reporting. His story about the Malapa embargo “break” l...

Online papers

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A propos to the “open access” theme, reader Bram Hessels writes in with a link to his “People with Online Paleoanthropology Papers” page.

ACS ends print journals

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Ars Technica’s John Timmer writes about the decline of print science journals, as the American Chemical Society abandons the format. Some reminiscences:

The next scientific publishing

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Michael Nielsen writes that the scientific publishing industry is set for a “disruption”. It’s an interesting read, and in a sample, he strikes on the same a...