All posts tagged with blogging

Link: Science blogs back!

1 minute read

Nature this week has a nice feature article on blogging in science, by Eryn Brown and Chris Woolston: “Why science blogging still matters”.

Link: Blogging and careers

1 minute read

This is a nice piece in ChronicleVitae by Terry McGlynn: “Why Blogging Is Still Good for Your Career”.

Science blogs changing with the times?

less than 1 minute read

A short piece “On the evolution of the science blogosphere” by the Andy Extance of the ScienceSeeker team has some interesting notes on current statistics in...

An eleventh year of blogging

4 minute read

I don’t have an official anniversary date for blogging. I had many false starts, and I spent a good part of 2004 developing the current iteration of the blog...

Rising Star Expedition update

less than 1 minute read

For the past five days, I’ve been cataloguing dozens of fossils from the Rising Star site. The National Geographic Rising Star Expedition blog has some incre...

The brains behind an exhibition

2 minute read

Sara Perry writing on Savage Minds, this time with an interesting historical story about the Wellcome Collection’s recent “Brains: Mind as Matter” exhibition...

Speak up and matter

2 minute read

Current Biology is running a short editorial by Geoffrey North, wishy-washing its way through a non-opinion about the value of blogging in science (“Social M...

Blogging in biological anthropology profile

less than 1 minute read

Nature’s “SpotOn” feature has interviewed University of Rhode Island biological anthropologist Holly Dunsworth about her social media mastery: “Social Media ...

Anthropology's online ecology

less than 1 minute read

Jason Antrosio has composed a short report on the “Anthropology Blogosphere 2013 Ecology of Online Anthropology”. I appreciate his kind words about my work ...

Blog of the seven veils

1 minute read

Why should academics consider blogging, and when should they band together to work on a group blog? An interview from early 2012 helps to answer those questi...

Ceramics in the Epigravettian of Croatia

1 minute read

I’ve had a paper on my desktop for more than a week expecting to write a comment on it, and now happily I discover that the first author, Becky Farbstein, ha...

Making a difference via blogging

1 minute read

Paul Knoepfler, a UC-Davis cell biologist, runs a very active blog in which he discusses the science of stem cells. One of his recurrent themes is strong cri...

Zeigarnik, bane of bloggers

less than 1 minute read

Maria Konnikova takes a psychological experiment on memory into an excursion on literature: “On writing, memory, and forgetting: Socrates and Hemingway take ...

Re-prioritizing faster communication

less than 1 minute read

Two experts on social policy from the London School of Economics comment on the importance of blogging and public outreach for academics, in an interview rep...

Blogs rank high in online education

1 minute read

This morning I read a notice from our Division of Continuing Studies, pointing to how their online resource library had received more than one million visits...

XMRV saga develops

1 minute read

John Timmer’s reporting on the rise and fall of the hypothesis that XMRV causes chronic fatigue syndrome is the best I’ve seen so far on the topic: “How a Co...

Digital anthropology panel

less than 1 minute read

Daniel Lende reports on the AAA panel on Digital Anthropology: Projects and Platforms.

Growing teeth

less than 1 minute read

Zachary Cofran has been dissertation blogging about his work on dental development in robust australopithecines: “Data, development and diets”. An interestin...

Social texting

less than 1 minute read

My essay in Anthropologies (“What’s wrong with anthropology”) is cited by Monalisa Gharavi in a review for Social Text of David Graeber’s new book, Debt: The...

Blogs, academic discourse in economics

less than 1 minute read

Paul Krugman comments on how the growth in academic blogs in economics is a continuation of publication trends that long predate the World Wide Web: “Our blo...

(someone else's) Tips on finding an audience

less than 1 minute read

Consultant and former humanities student James Mulvey offers advice for how to make your online writing have more impact: “Expand your blog’s reach”. Yes, I’...

How to blog for your lab

1 minute read

Christie Wilcox makes a case that every lab should be doing science outreach on social media: “Social media for scientists Part 1: It’s our job, and Part 2: ...

An arsenical profile

2 minute read

Popular Science writer Tom Clynes gives us a long profile of Felisa Wolfe-Simon, who became a lightning rod for criticism after she authored an article claim...

Changing how academia works

1 minute read

An interesting conversation has emerged over the last few weeks on several economics and legal blogs, usefully encapsulated by Kim Krawiec at The Faculty Lou...

Blogging for scholars

2 minute read

Stephen T. Casper writes on “Why academics should blog”, with an interesting historical perspective. Once upon a time, faculty clubs, dining facilities and p...

Conference blogging by Sci

less than 1 minute read

Scicurious has written a very nice howto giving concrete advice about blogging a conference: “How To Blog a Conference”. Lots and lots of good ideas and advi...

Social media in science

1 minute read

Last month, Virginia Gewin put an article in Nature about social media and science, which is now available online for free: “Social media: Self-reflection, o...

Best open letter ever

less than 1 minute read

I so totally wish I’d thought of this first: “An Open Letter To People Who Think They Have Found The Artifact That Will Change Archaeology As We Know It”

Blogging archaeology

less than 1 minute read

Following up on Nicolas Laracuente’s Storify collections of tweets from the SAA meetings, I wanted to point to his compilation from the Blogging Archaeology ...

The person attached

less than 1 minute read

Colleen Morgan is preparing for a session on blogging and archaeology at the SAA meetings later this month and has started a carnival to highlight posts from...

The long tail

less than 1 minute read

Do texts and tweets “change the nature of in-depth analysis”? Wired commentator Clive Thompson thinks so, because they take away the impetus for “middle-form...

Peerless critiques

1 minute read

Nature last week posted an open access editorial, “Response required”, on the need for authors of high-profile papers to engage with online commentary on blo...

Public engagement

1 minute read

Nature’s Gene Russo has a nice article this week about scientists’ attitudes toward colleagues who do lots of public outreach: “Outreach: Meet the press”.

Quote: John Lachs on blogging

less than 1 minute read

From a piece in The Tennesseean, worthy of a place in the Onion except it’s apparently serious: “Internet bloggers uncrafted output completely self-serving”

This is a blog

less than 1 minute read

Farhad Manjoo at Slate enters an essay, “This Is Not A Blog Post” hand-wringing about the convergence of blogs and magazines.

Field primatology

less than 1 minute read

Noah Snyder-Mackler’s continuing series in the NY Times’ “Scientist at Work” blog has been providing a journal of his fieldwork on gelada baboons.

Saving science writing

less than 1 minute read

Wired editor David Rowan wrote last week about “How to save science journalism”. It’s a long essay, discussing the problems traditional media outlets have su...

Blogging and teaching

less than 1 minute read

If you’re an instructor curious about how to introduce blogs in your courses, you may want to read this post by Daniel Lende at the new Neuroanthropology. He...

PLoS Blogs

less than 1 minute read

PLoS now has blogs. The announcement accentuates that they have an equal representation of scientists and science journalists.

Guardian science blogs

less than 1 minute read

The Guardian now has a small network of science blogs. Their launch announcement includes this surprising factoid:

Blog networks' problems links

4 minute read

I’ve collected several links over the past few days to people thinking about the role of blog networks in the science blogome. Several essays worth reading i...

Siphoning the firehose

1 minute read

Bora Zivkovic leaves ScienceBlogs and reminds us of the imprint that blogging has made on some careers in the last five years. Reading his thoughts on bloggi...

Snark and trade

less than 1 minute read

If you haven’t had your fill of angsty petulance, then Scienceblogs and its stable of writers have been wading through Edward versus Jacob territory. Jonatha...

Meeting casts

2 minute read

I’m just back from the physical anthropology meetings. What a lot of interesting things there were – a few in the sessions, and many outside of them!

Bloggers and embargoes

less than 1 minute read

An interesting factoid from Bora Zivkovic, writing about PLoS media coverage:

Book notes: Free, by Chris Anderson

9 minute read

I read Chris Anderson’s book because it was, well, “Free”. The book’s thesis is simple: Sometimes people profit by giving things away.

Write with a knife

less than 1 minute read

It’s that time of year again, when students all over the country are facing their first writing assignment. I always encourage a bloggy style – concise, jour...

Nature on conference blogging

1 minute read

Nature’s editorial, “How to stop blogging” (which might sound like a self-help piece), takes a position on the conference blogging issue:

Conference blogging, continued

less than 1 minute read

Today’s Nature picks up the conference blogging story that I covered last week. An interesting perspective:

Blogging and reporting from meetings

3 minute read

No, I’m not doing that right now. Elizabeth Pennisi reports that some science writers are miffed about bloggers at scientific conferences:

Blogging not for everyone

less than 1 minute read

The New York Times has a story in its Fashion section: “Blogs Falling in an Empty Forest”

Photoshop web colors

less than 1 minute read

This is off the usual topics, but I mentioned once how poorly colors were coming out when I save sketchbook pieces as JPG. They look great in Photoshop, but ...

Science journalism, blogging, and the web

6 minute read

Nature (open access) discusses the decline of science journalism and the rise of blogs. The article profiles John Timmer, whose stuff at Nobel Intent I read ...

Sharing your work with the world: a workshop

less than 1 minute read

I’m writing this post live from the Kaleidoscope program here at UW. My part of today’s program is a workshop on sharing your work with the world, using blog...

Some blogging essays

2 minute read

Andrew Sullivan reflects in an essay in this month’s Atlantic about how blogging has evolved for him. I don’t usually read Sullivan, but this is well put tog...

Open science profile

1 minute read

The Boston Globe runs a piece on “open science” (big in the Boston area) and hits on an obvious problem: